Cloud Agnostic – Not a myth anymore, just architect solution differently

Vendor Lock-In – a term which every IT decision maker is either talking and thinking about. No one wants to be locked with one cloud provider but like to have flexibility to move around or at-least have an option to move around enterprise workloads between different cloud providers.

Multi-Cloud Strategy

Knowingly or unknowingly many organizations already find themselves of adopting multi-cloud strategy. Meaning they are using different cloud providers for their multiple workloads, example – one workload in AWS and another workload in Azure, but don’t have the flexibility to move workloads from AWS to Azure or vice-versa.

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Example of Multi-cloud strategy

Within the above multi-cloud strategy example, if IT wants to move Workload-2 from Azure to AWS, it will not be straightforward, and it will require some effort. Reason for that – because Workload-2 was not designed to be cloud agnostic.

So, what is Cloud Agnostics?

A workload that can be migrated seamlessly around different vendor clouds will be called a true cloud agnostics workload. But is it possible to be true cloud agnostic? Yes, it is, you just have to design and architect it to be cloud agnostic. But before we look into how to design a cloud agnostic solution, let’s look at different models in the way a workload can be cloud agnostics.

Dev/Test and Production Segregation

Running development and testing on one environment and production on another environment is one of the most common scenarios. Benefits of this setup is, running development and testing on cloud environments which are cheaper and don’t require scalability, and only use Production where scalability is required.

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Example of Dev/Test and Production segregation

Disaster Recovery in another cloud platform

Leveraging another cloud provider for Disaster Recovery environment is the most useful scenario for being cloud agnostics. It requires running production environment on one cloud provider and running same copy of application on another cloud provider. If production environment goes down, all requests should be diverted to DR environment hosted on another cloud provider. While designing this cloud agnostics DR strategy, you have to keep RTO (Recovery Time Objective) and RPO (Recovery Point objective) in mind and design it accordingly, which will drive decisions like – how frequently data sync need to happen across DR site, etc.

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Example of Disaster recovery in another cloud platform

Production in multi-cloud (truly cloud agnostic)

It requires running application simultaneously on different vendor clouds and both sites are up and running simultaneously and sharing user load. Benefits of this approach is – in case one cloud provider runs into issue and goes down, your workload is still up and running without any or with minimal RPO (Recovery Point Objective) impact. Only drawback of this approach will be – cost, as you will be paying double to both cloud providers. But it’s an ideal solution of business mission critical applications.

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Example of Production environments in multi-cloud

How to architect workloads to be cloud agnostics?

Before you decide designing your solution, you need to understand what all services are common across different cloud providers. To understand that, you can categorize cloud services broadly within three categories,

  1. Base Services – Services which has become standard to provide any cloud-based services, such as virtualization, networking etc.
  2. Broadly Accepted Services – Services which has been industry accepted and mostly available across all cloud provides. Example of these type of services are, Dockers, Kubernetes, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, etc. As the cloud adoption increases, you will see more an more services getting moved within this category.
  3. Unique Services – These are services which are unique to each cloud provider and becomes their selling point and differentiator. Examples of these are AWS Lambda, Azure IoT Hub, Azure Cognitive Services, etc.

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Segregation or categorization of services

Now to design/architect your solution and be cloud agnostic, prefer to choose services from first two categories. If you choose to use any of the unique services provided by cloud providers, in that case you are automatically tied up with that provider and you are no more cloud agnostic.

Managed Services

Question arises, if you restrict yourself up to broadly accepted services, in that case you may miss out most of the managed services provided by cloud platforms. If any of the managed service provides huge advantage in comparison to building on your own, in that case it makes sense to use it, rather than not using it for the sake of vendor lock-in. If you still want to be vendor independent, in that case there are two options,

  1. Look for managed services which accepts common protocols. Example of this is – Azure Cosmos DB, which can be accessed using MongoDB wire protocol. So, your application can have flexibility to leverage Azure Cosmos DB using MongoDB APIs within Azure, while also leveraging Mongo DB in AWS, getting a benefit of managed service within Azure.
  2. Second option is to have your own layer of segregation before leveraging managed services, so that you can switch to another provider later.

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Example of custom providers for different cloud platforms

 

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